Metro

‘Expect some impact’ from nor’easter through Wednesday

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Mayor Bill de Blasio is warning New Yorkers to “expect some impact” from the nor’easter until Wednesday morning.

Hizzoner said city officials would be remaining “vigilant” as the worst of the rain — which prompted a flash flood warning and state of emergency downstate — began to subside Tuesday morning.

During his press briefing, de Blasio said the five boroughs had seen 2 to 3 inches of rain and winds of up to 37 mph.

Bill de Blasio
Mayor Bill de Blasio said New Yorkers should “expect some impact” from the nor’easter until Wednesday.
People with an umbrella walk through Times Square in the rain in the Manhattan borough of New York City
So far, the storm’s disruptions have been minimal.
REUTERS/Carlo Allegri

He said the custodial staff at 250 of the city’s public schools worked overnight amid the storm, while the city Department of Environmental Protection cleaned 4,500 catch basins and workers placed 450 sandbags in Queens.

“Hopefully, now, we’ve seen the worst of it, and in the next couple hours, the worst of the rain will pass,” the mayor said at about 10:20 a.m. “But we are going to remain vigilant throughout.”

“We like when the reports are right, and the reports tell us we’re not going to have a big problem, and this time, the reports held,” he added.

Mayor de Blasio
De Blasio said city officials would be remaining “vigilant.”

Andrew D’Amora, acting commissioner of the city’s emergency management agency, said a local flash flood watch will remain in effect until 6 p.m. Tuesday. He said the downpour is expected to bring a total of 3 to 4 inches of rain to the five boroughs.

So far, the storm’s disruptions have been minimal, he said. The MTA’s Staten Island Railway service that was for a short time suspended between the Huguenot and Tottenville neighborhoods in both directions was restored. No weather-related subway service delays have been reported, D’Amora added.

Flooded cars are pictured on a street as heavy rain moved into the northeast U.S. in Hoboken, New Jersey.
Flooded cars on a street as heavy rain moved into Hoboken, New Jersey.
REUTERS/Mike Segar

About 200 Con Ed customers are without power, while four to five trees are down citywide, he said.

“There haven’t been many significant impacts at this point, but we are staying vigilant,” he said during the press conference. “Our emergency operations center [has been] open since last night, and it will stay open through the remainder of the storm.”

“We didn’t see any significant impacts” on the roads, he added. “Any kind of roadways that experienced some flooding [were] momentary closures, crews were on the scene.”

Traffic backed up on the Prospect Expressway because of the nor'easter that hit New York CIty last night
A local flash flood watch will remain in effect until 6 p.m. Tuesday.
Gregory P. Mango

The rainfall comes after a deadly deluge in early September killed 13 New Yorkers, including 11 people who drowned in their basements, as city and state officials were caught flat-footed by the remnants of Hurricane Ida.

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